“A Rich Spot of Earth”

Until yesterday I had no idea that Thomas Jefferson was the first American to grow rutabaga. According to Peter Hatch, recently retired director of Monticello’s gardens and grounds, author of “A Rich Spot of Earth”: Thomas Jefferson’s Revolutionary Garden at Monticello, and speaker at yesterday’s Garden Design Luncheon (an annual fundraiser for Blithewold’s education programs), […]

Grand finale

This weekend is the gardens’ final huzzah and I can hardly believe it. The season went by so quickly and it’s quite possible that the gardens have never been prettier than they are right this minute. It will break our hearts to have to start taking annuals out next week. But after Monday’s holiday the […]

Sun catchers

This whole glorious summer-like week I have been in raptures over the light. How it slides in sideways through the morning and afternoon… (Are you stuck inside then? Shame.) How it would be blinding if not for the brim of my hat and the contrast is high — the shadows are extra dark — but […]

Equanimity

It feels like the pendulum has paused exactly mid-swing, balanced between seasons, temperature extremes, and in the high blue sky between dewy mornings and golden afternoons. Right here, right now, everything, except maybe my raging allergies, feels like bliss. In time with the Autumnal equinox, we too are poised right at the edge of thinking […]

Kaleidoscope

I am always reluctant to say goodbye to summer but this morning, as I type with cold hands for the first time in months, I have to acknowledge a shift. The capricious weather has been bouncing from gray stormy back to sultry only to blow on a breeze to delicious apple-crisp. And visitors to the […]