Ahead of schedule

I don’t want to crow in case any of you are feeling swamped – either by the end of the garden’s season or in anticipation of the holidays – but as Gail would say, “we’re in good shape!” Almost all of the gardens are cut back and tidied (we take our time cutting back the […]

“A Rich Spot of Earth”

Until yesterday I had no idea that Thomas Jefferson was the first American to grow rutabaga. According to Peter Hatch, recently retired director of Monticello’s gardens and grounds, author of “A Rich Spot of Earth”: Thomas Jefferson’s Revolutionary Garden at Monticello, and speaker at yesterday’s Garden Design Luncheon (an annual fundraiser for Blithewold’s education programs), […]

Bulb planting challenges

The great thing about tulips is that no matter what, they make us happy when they bloom. Even if they’re planted in a jellybean mix of reds, pinks, and yellows. — Maybe especially then because it’s spring and after the dreariness of winter, anything goes. But even so, Gail, Betsy and I put a lot […]

Keepers

Temperatures dipped into the 30s last night but if only it would frost we’d feel justified in having taken the gardens apart this week. The Rose Garden might have the hardest to let go of, it was still so pretty. One of the volunteers called it “Slaughter Day” (which this time of year will henceforth […]

Heavy lifting

Physical labor was one of the first things that drew me to gardening. — Back when I was 18 and restless from so much sitting in school and studying. (Do most people take up jogging or playing team sports?) And while I do still find the drop-dead exhaustion of a long day’s work outside exquisitely […]